An important measure of your heart’s health

It would not be uncommon among a group of guys, for one of the men who’s been lifting weights to build his biceps, to push up his sleeves, lift and bend his arms, tighten his fists, and flex his biceps. Showing off the results of all that hard work in the gym. Too bad we can’t do the same type of thing to demonstrate the strength and size of our heart. People tend to forget that the heart is a muscle too, and it responds to exercise the same way other muscles do, by getting bigger and stronger. A well trained heart can be 30 to 40 percent…

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Hit an exercise plateau? Try this!

Hands Of A Woman Squeezing A Stress Ball

Plateau. That dreaded word that you do not want to hear, let alone experience. Especially if you have been diligently exercising in an attempt to get fit or lose weight. We have all experienced a plateau at some time all of a sudden you stop losing weight or you just cant seem to run any faster. When you hit a plateau, don’t panic. It doesn’t necessarily mean you need to change-up everything or spend more time exercising.

Pay attention to pain

Pay attention to pain

When you use muscles you have not used for a while or try a new exercise or training technique, it is normal to feel a dull ache of soreness in the muscles that were trained. This pain is caused by microscopic tears in the fibers of the connective tissues in your body–the ligaments that connect bones to other bones, and the tendons that connect muscles to bones. This microtrauma may sound harmful but is in fact the natural response of your muscles when they experience work.

Can too much exercise hurt your heart?

Can too much exercise hurt your heart?

DID YOU KNOW?
If a moderate amount of exercise is good, it seems like a lot of exercise would be great for your body. But exercising too much and over training your body can lead to issues such as fatigue, a reduction in overall performance. Also, by not letting your muscles recover, you may also experience persistent soreness and a reduction in performance. In essence, it’s possible to exercise so much that the very benefits of fitness become drawbacks by triggering negative responses in the body.

5 signs you are overdoing your workout


5 signs you are overdoing your workout

DID YOU KNOW?
Overtraining syndrome frequently occurs in athletes who are training for competition or a specific event and train beyond the body’s ability to recover. Athletes often exercise longer and harder so they can improve. But without adequate rest and recovery, these training regimens can backfire, and actually decrease performance. Conditioning requires a balance between overload and recovery. Too much overload and/or too little recovery may result in both physical and psychology symptoms of overtraining syndrome.