How to get the junk out of your cells

DID YOU KNOW
Without the sweeping away of debris within the cell, cells could become choked with trash and malfunction or die. In recent years, some scientists have begun to suspect that faulty autophagy mechanisms contribute to the development of a range of diseases, including diabetes, muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer’s and cancer. The slowing of autophagy as we reach middle age is also believed to play a role in aging.

Link to article in the NY Times

Doing this can have a profound impact on your health

DID YOU KNOW?
Spending an extra hour sitting a day (for 13, rather than 12, hours) is linked to a 50 per cent greater risk of being disabled. And this was regardless of whether the participants also did moderate exercise, according to the U.S. study published in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health. You might assume that knee osteoarthritis is more likely in people who put their bodies through tough exercise routines. But experts say there is also a link with sitting too much.

4 ways to beat the winter blues

Winter blues can make me irritable, fussy and on edge. Whenever it’s cloudy and overcast, drizzly, raining or gloomy weather, we all tend to get a little depressed. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is actually a clinical condition. It affects mostly women in their 20s, 30s and 40s but can affect men and children as well. Whether you suffer from SAD or not, here are 4 proven ways to beat the winter blues.

Do gin soaked raisins really work?

Gin is flavored with juniper berries and juniper berries contain Terpinen, these chemicals have anti inflammatory properties. Arthritis patients are supposed to eat nine gin soaked raisins every day. The anti-inflammatory chemicals include ascorbic acid, cinnamic acid, coumarin, and myricetin. The pain-relieving chemicals are ferulic acid, gentisic acid, kaempferol-glucosides, and aspirin-like salicylic acid.

Exciting new research on the brain and exercise

Some of the most exciting scientific research of late is on the associative value of exercise and brain activity. We’ve known that there is a beneficial relationship between exercise and brainpower. But the newest findings make it clear that it’s not just a relationship; it’s THE relationship.

The best evidence comes from several new studies of lab animals. Until recently, there was little research done to isolate the one particular thing that mattered most as it related to increasing the brainpower of mice.