Surviving the Holiday party season

Whether it’s the office party or another Holiday social event it’s a given there will be something to eat. Usually it’s a smorgasbord of many different food items, ranging from a broccoli and carrot plate with dipping sauce, to deep fried cheese, and you can fill in the rest. It can be tricky tying not to pack on a few pounds this time of the year.

One thing that can help is to recognize that your body gauges fullness by the volume of food in your stomach. Understanding this allows you to actually eat more while taking in fewer calories by choosing foods based on their energy density…

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Avoid putting on those extra holiday pounds

DID YOU KNOW
It’s commonly thought that the typical holiday weight gain is around 5 pounds. In reality, it’s probably less. The catch, though, is that even a small holiday weight gain is seldom lost — adding to the cumulative weight gain that happens over time for most adults. Between the colder weather, shortened daylight hours, and seemingly endless indulgent holidays (from Thanksgiving to Valentine’s Day), there’s no question that winter creates a perfect storm for weight gain.

Gratitude and your health

DID YOU KNOW? 

  • Turkeys have heart attacks. When the Air Force was conducting test runs and breaking the sound barrier, fields of turkeys would drop dead.
  • 91% of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving Day.
  • Fifty percent of Americans put the stuffing inside the Turkey.
  • More than 40 million green bean casseroles are served on Thanksgiving.
  • Contrary to popular belief, Native Americans did not eat cranberries. They did, however, find them extremely useful for dying fabric and decorating pottery.
  • A spooked turkey can run at speeds up to 20 miles per hour.

How to not get a cold or the flu this holiday season

DID YOU KNOW
Cold and flu share many similarities, but they are two distinct conditions. The American Academy of Family Physicians says more than 200 viruses cause colds, but few viruses cause the flu. If someone in your household is sick, prevent germs from spreading by providing separate (or disposable) cups and towels in the kitchen and bathroom. Many contagious diseases are transmitted by touch. The simple friction that occurs when you rub skin against skin while using hot water and soap, followed by drying, gets rid of potentially harmful germs.

New Year advice that could change your life


DID YOU KNOW
Timothy Pychyl, a professor of psychology at Carleton University in Canada, says that resolutions are a form of “cultural procrastination,” an effort to reinvent oneself. People make resolutions as a way of motivating themselves, he says. Pychyl argues that people aren’t ready to change their habits, particularly bad habits, and that accounts for the high failure rate. Another reason, says Dr. Avya Sharma of the Canadian Obesity Network, is that people set unrealistic goals and expectations in their resolutions.